Fresh Sweet Corn & Blueberry Salsa Recipe

Fresh Sweet Corn & Blueberry Salsa Recipe | www.littlerustedladle.com | Jena Carlin & Jim Rude | #foodphotography #sweetcorn #blueberrySweet corn season may be coming to an end soon, but football season is just getting started. That means chips and salsa. Oh sure, you could go with the standard pre-made stuff in the jar, or be fancy and make fresh pico with tomatoes, peppers, onions and cilantro. Either way isn’t bad. However, if you want to jazz up football Sunday a little and impress your guests as well, try our famous sweet corn and blueberry salsa recipe(famous?) Alright, so it isn’t famous…yet, but make it enough times, and it just might be. At least with those closest to you like friends and family. When it comes right down to it, does anyone else really matter? Skelly’s sweet corn, as I described in our last article, is so tender and sweet, we thought it needed a recipe to let it shine on it’s own. With a few other ingredients to help it out of course.

SkellyFresh Sweet Corn & Blueberry Salsa Recipe | www.littlerustedladle.com | Jena Carlin & Jim Rude | #foodphotography #sweetcorn #blueberryMint and Basil Food Photography | www.littlerustedladle.com | Jena Carlin & Jim Rude | #foodphotography #green #herbsFresh Sweet Corn & Blueberry Salsa Recipe | www.littlerustedladle.com | Jena Carlin & Jim Rude | #foodphotography #sweetcorn #blueberrySweet Corn and Blueberry Salad - Jena Carlin Photography - Midwest food photography - Editorial- 18 96WM-2Fresh Sweet Corn & Blueberry Salsa Recipe | www.littlerustedladle.com | Jena Carlin & Jim Rude | #foodphotography #sweetcorn #peppers

These other ingredients act like teammates of a football team that give your stud quarterback, like our Packers very own Aaron Rodgers, time to complete touchdown after touchdown. The additional teammates, known as ingredients, add dimension to the superstar (the sweet corn), giving it the ability to be the hero. In this recipe, the blueberries give sweetness and color like a quick running back or wide receiver. The mint, adds freshness like a productive new draft pick. The lime adds a touch of acidity like a coach in charge. The roasted poblano adds a little heat like a solid defense. The pistachios add crunch like a hard hitting secondary, and the olive oil adds a little fat like, well, the offensive line. All together, they add up to a solid salsa that’s loaded with flavor. As for the chip, which is similar to the fans, in that they are always supportive and necessary, we went with a newcomer. An incredibly full flavored organic blue corn tortilla chip made by a company called Food Should Taste Good.

Fresh Sweet Corn & Blueberry Salsa on Blue Corn Chips Recipe | www.littlerustedladle.com | Jena Carlin & Jim Rude | #foodphotography #sweetcorn #foodshouldtastgood

What’s great about Food Should Taste Good Tortilla Chips are that they are all natural, gluten free, non-GMO, certified kosher, cholesterol free, low sodium, and certified vegan. How’s that for fan support? The best part is they taste great and have an unusual shape, which makes them fun to throw on a table with your star salsa. We hope you enjoy our fresh sweet corn and blueberry salsa at your next tailgate or football watching party. For those of you who hate football, you can enjoy this wonderful salsa as a salad by adding fresh arugula(optional) while reading a book on a lazy Sunday afternoon. Until next time, cook with love and live to cook.

Jim & Jena

 

Fresh Sweet Corn & Blueberry Salsa/Salad
 
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This flavorful corn salsa recipe combines fresh sweet corn with blueberries, mint, lime juice and pistachios to produce a knock your socks off appetizer that, when added to fresh greens like arugula, makes a wonderful salad as well.
Author:
Recipe type: Salad
Cuisine: American, southwest
Serves: 8 servings
Ingredients
  • 4 ears of fresh sweet corn, kernels removed (2 cups)
  • 1 cup blueberries
  • 1 tbsp. fresh mint, chopped
  • 2 tbsp. fresh lime juice
  • ¼ cup light olive oil
  • 1 tbsp. honey
  • 1 small poblano pepper, roasted, skin removed, seeded & chopped (1/2 cup)
  • ¼ cup roasted pistachios
  • kosher salt & black pepper, to taste
  • 1 bag corn tortilla chips like Food Should Taste Good
  • 3 cups fresh arugula, washed, optional
Instructions
  1. Combine first 8 ingredients in a medium size bowl.
  2. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
  3. Serve with tortilla chips, or add to fresh greens and serve as a salad.
Notes
For a light, but filling entree, serve salsa with grilled chicken, salmon or pork.

 

Cookie Cooks - This sounds and looks absolutely delicious! Thanks for sharing.

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Fire Roasted Sweet Corn – Rows and rows of sweetness

Farmers Market - Fire Roasted Corn on the Cob Recipe - www.littlerustedladle.com - Midwest food photography - Editorial #foodphotography #foodstyling #sweetcorn

The perfectly lined up rows of golden kernels shimmer in the afternoon sunshine like pearls, as I peel back the squeaky green husks exposing the ever familiar site of sweet corn.  Hidden behind the green husks and silk that gives these golden gems life are more than just small nuggets of sunshine.  They’re a reminder to me of everything that is good.  Childhood memories of eating ear after ear of fresh picked sweet corn at the family dinner table with my mom, dad, sister, aunt and uncle, invade my thoughts like a kid waiting for summer break.  You see, sweet corn season was not just another vegetable that we ate during it’s peak, it was usually the main course.

Sweet Corn Field - Fire Roasted Sweet Corn with Vegetable Medley - www.littlerustedladle.com #sweetcorn #cornonthecob #farmtotableFarmers Market - Fire Roasted Corn on the Cob Recipe - www.littlerustedladle.com - Midwest food photography - Editorial #foodphotography #foodstyling #sweetcorn

My dad would get 4 or 5 dozen ears of corn picked early in the morning from the field.  He would cook them in a large kettle of boiling water, then pile them high on a huge platter in the center of the table much like a turkey on Thanksgiving Day.  Everyone would look at the platter, visually picking out the ear they most wanted. This was usually the same for all of us.  We wanted the ears with the smallest kernels.  These young ears tend to be the sweetest.  Many people overlook these small-eared gems, instead, going for those with the big kernels.  Amateurs!

Farmers Market - Fire Roasted Corn on the Cob Recipe - www.littlerustedladle.com - Midwest food photography - Editorial #foodphotography #foodstyling #sweetcorn

Our corn eating ritual was unique. We would each have a paper bag next to us on the floor to drop the empty ears into.  The sound of an ear falling into the bag was a reminder to the rest of us that someone would be grabbing another prime ear of sweet summer.  It was not uncommon for us to go through six to eight ears of corn a piece.  My personal best was 11 – not as impressive as my aunt Cille’s record of 13, but not bad for a teenager.

Of course, there also were those other wonders of summer at the table, but when there was fresh sweet corn, everything else was viewed as a “side.” Brats, burgers or sliced round steak made their way to our plates, along with fresh sliced tomatoes from the garden and cucumber salad. No store-bought deli items found their way onto a table in our house. Summer meant enjoying the bounties from our own garden. Corn was the exception, because we were not able to grow it, but it didn’t come from a grocery store.

As I grew up and started raising my own kids, I often wondered where was I going to get corn as good as dad got every year.  Then, on a trip back home to visit my parents, I got my answer.  The sign by the side of the road said “Skelly’s”, with the words “sweet corn” next to it.  I had friends tell me it was good, but being a pro corn eater, I knew what “good corn” was really like.  Much to my amazement, it was actually better than I remembered as a child.  The flavor was so sweet and the kernels were so tender.  Plus, unlike my memories as a child who had to “shuck” his fair share of corn, there were no worms on the ends.  There was nothing worse then opening up an ear of corn and finding worms crawling around the kernels. It often would ruin the mood so to speak.

Farmers Market - Fire Roasted Corn on the Cob Recipe - www.littlerustedladle.com - Midwest food photography - Editorial #foodphotography #foodstyling #sweetcornFarmers Market - Fire Roasted Corn on the Cob Recipe - www.littlerustedladle.com - Midwest food photography - Editorial #foodphotography #foodstyling #sweetcorn

Recently, Jena and I took a trip to Skelly’s and talked to Scott Skelly about what makes their sweet corn so good.  Scott’s family has been farming in the Rock County area since the mid 1850’s.  Their venture into growing sweet corn started by planting a few rows near their farm house as a way for the kids to make a little extra money for college.   The corn was sold at a vegetable stand out front like many rural farms do.  However, it sold so well, they needed to plant more each year.  The sweet corn business is so successful today that their corn crop alone takes up over 100 acres of land.  That’s a lot of corn.  To see where Skelly’s corn, as well as their other wonderful produce are sold, check out their website Here.  They also have killer products like apple cider doughnuts and cider coming up soon.

Skelly’s test plants dozens of varieties every year.  From these test plants, the family chooses the best ones.  What’s really great about Skelly’s corn and many small local farms like them, is that they don’t skimp on quality.  They would rather grow the most tender and sweet varieties instead of choosing varieties that stay fresh longer, but lack tenderness.  Much of the sweet corn you find in the grocery stores, especially corn found in the offseason, comes from distant farms, and has a tougher kernel.  How tender is Skelly’s corn?  Well, the blueberry corn salad we’ll be posting next week is made with uncooked corn. It’s so sweet you don’t need to cook it.

Farmers Market - Fire Roasted Corn on the Cob Recipe - www.littlerustedladle.com - Midwest food photography - Editorial #foodphotography #foodstyling #sweetcornFarmers Market - Fire Roasted Corn on the Cob Recipe - www.littlerustedladle.com - Midwest food photography - Editorial #foodphotography #foodstyling #sweetcornFarmers Market - Fire Roasted Corn on the Cob Recipe - www.littlerustedladle.com - Midwest food photography - Editorial #foodphotography #foodstyling #sweetcornSweet Blue Butter Recipe - Fire Roasted Corn on the Cob Recipe - www.littlerustedladle.com - Midwest food photography - Editorial #foodphotography #foodstyling #sweetcornFarmers Market - Fire Roasted Corn on the Cob Recipe - www.littlerustedladle.com - Midwest food photography - Editorial #foodphotography #foodstyling #sweetcornFarmers Market - Fire Roasted Corn on the Cob Recipe - www.littlerustedladle.com - Midwest food photography - Editorial #foodphotography #foodstyling #sweetcorn

I think what I enjoy so much about sweet corn season, is the fact that you need to get your hands into the action when preparing it. Grabbing a bag and husking a dozen ears of corn reminds me of where it came from. A plant, grown on a family farm much like Skelly’s. Notice how peeling back the husks entices your sense of smell. Feel the bumpy kernels as you peel off the layers. See and appreciate the perfect yellow and white rows. Listen to the sound of the corn hitting the grill or the boiling water as the ears are lowered into the pot. All these sensory stimuli prepare us for the final experience; eating it. I envision my ancestors from generations past doing the same thing. It’s a good feeling.

The recipe shown in the video is pretty tasty for an occasional change, but my favorite way to enjoy corn on the cob is probably the simplest way…with butter and a touch of salt…just like back in the day.

As always, remember to cook with love and live to cook.

Jim & Jena

Fire Roasted Sweet Corn with Vegetable Medley
 
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Sweet corn gets a major overhaul with this recipe with the addition of a flavored butter, bacon, tomatoes, beets micro greens and a drizzle of pistachio oil. You may not look at corn the same way.
Author:
Recipe type: Side Dish
Cuisine: American
Serves: 7 ears
Ingredients
  • 7 ears sweet corn, most of husks and silk removed then tied closed with string.
  • ½ cup sweet blue butter (see recipe below), partially melted
  • ¼ cup smoked blue cheese crumbles(may substitute plain blue crumbles for smoked
  • ¼ cup crumbled bacon
  • ½ cup grape tomatoes, halved
  • 1 whole cooked beet, cut into small dice
  • ¼ cup micro greens(may substitute alfalfa sprouts
  • 1 tsp. pistachio oil, optional
  • fresh cracked pepper, to taste
Instructions
  1. Soak tied corn in a large pail or pot of cold water for 1-2 hours. Meanwhile, make sweet blue butter by following directions in the recipe below.
  2. Drain corn well and pat dry. Place on preheated grill, cover and cook for 15-20 minutes over medium heat, turning every 5-7 minutes. When husks are charred and corn is cooked, remove from grill, and carefully pull back husks and tie with string. You may want to use gloves because the corn will be hot.
  3. Transfer corn to a platter or tray and sprinkle remaining ingredients over the corn. Serve.
Notes
Corn husks can be removed after cooking if desired.

 
Sweet Blue Butter
 
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This sweet and savory butter gets much of it's flavor from a local spiced chutney. It goes well on almost anything, but it shines on corn or cornbread.
Author:
Recipe type: Condiment
Cuisine: American
Serves: 2½ cups
Ingredients
  • 1 lb. Unsalted butter, softened
  • ¼ cup Sa Braai Mild Chutney (sold in Milwaukee grocery stores)
  • ¼ cup Roth Moody Blue Cheese, crumbled
  • 2 Tbsp. chopped fresh herbs such as chives, parsley, and thyme
  • 2 Tbsp. mild banana peppers, finely chopped
  • ½ tsp. freshly ground black pepper
  • ⅛ tsp. ground cinnamon
  • ½ tsp. kosher salt
Instructions
  1. Combine all ingredients in a medium size bowl. Beat on medium speed with a hand mixer until creamy and well blended. Use on fire roasted corn recipe above, or refrigerate until needed.
Notes
You can substitute mango chutney for the Sa Braai chutney if desired.

Pang {circahappy} - I <3 <3 <3 this post. I always love farm stand, and always want to know their stories. It's nice to hear how much love & effort goes into the work they do. I went to corn field once with my family when I was young, and bought ton of them home. This post reminded me of that wonderful time. Thank you.

I love the vdo, as well 🙂

I can't wait for next week corn recipe. Until then, have a wonderful week.

Lovoni Walker - Pretty images!

Dione White - Beautiful shots! I am so impressed and inspired by how hard you both work on this site and the results are just stunning.

Homemade Edible Finger Paint

Homemade Edible Finger Paint | Little Rusted Ladle | #fingerpaint #edible #babyactivities
Swirl, drip, squiggle, smudge, fling, splatter… What is better then finger paint? Edible baby-safe finger paint you can make at home with this simple recipe! Six month old baby Austin created his first abstract expressionistic masterpiece! Here’s how we did it.

To make the paint mix equal parts baby rice cereal and water. Then add one drop food coloring. Add more drops of the same color to richen it or mix other colors to get your desired color. Add white to make it lighter and more opaque. We chose the colors of Austin’s nursery; red, white and shades of teal. The white really didn’t work that well in the painting. The teals were vibrant! We decided not to use the red in case it mixed together with the teals to create brown. The red would have been nice to use after the first layer dried but I was so impressed with Austin’s first go at it I left it alone sprayed it with a fixative and hung it up. An additional option that I thought would be fun is adding a flavor of some sort. I was a little concerned about encouraging him to eat paint so I left it out this time.

We choose a 10×10 inch pre-stretched canvas with a neutral color for Austin to paint on. Watercolor paper would be a great option as well! Avoid any thin paper that will bubble or rip when wet.

If you have older children they will know what to do but if you have a baby at three months you can set them up in a tummy-time manner and set the painting in front of them. Austin at six months sat up and I helped him dip his hands in each color. I also held him, dipped his feet in and let him kick around on the canvas. It sure was entertaining helping my Blooming Jackson Pollock create his first finger painting. However, when it was all said and done Austin may have preferred the brewer game that was on over finger painting… Daddy’s boy 😉

Jena

Homemade Edible Finger Paint
 
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Author:
Ingredients
  • Infant Rice Cereal
  • Water
  • Food Coloring
  • Fixative
  • *Amounts very per project, desired color, and consistency.
Instructions
  1. To make the paint mix equal parts baby rice cereal and water. Then add one drop food coloring. Add more drops of the same color to richen it or mix other colors to get your desired color. Add white to make it lighter and more opaque.
  2. When dry spray with fixative. Hang!

Pamela Roy Stasney - Such a fun idea!

Rhubarb Cocktails | It’s not just for dessert anymore

Rhubarb summer cocktail recipes  | www.littlerustedladle.com #rhubarb #cocktails #foodphotography
Rhubarb is one of those weird plants that shows up every year in the spring, and lasts a few months, then it’s gone.  It’s often paired with strawberries to make pie, but is ignored for anything else.  When you think about it though, it makes sense.  Strawberries are sweet, beautiful and their flavor is endlessly used as inspiration for all kinds of products at the grocery store.  Rhubarb however, goes largely unnoticed in the food world.  When was the last time you drank an ice cold rhubarb margarita or fizzy rhubarb and rosemary gin fizz? Well, Jena and I thought we would shed a little light on this tangy vegetable and show some wonderful ways to infuse your booze with the flavor of natures first sour vegetable, rhubarb.  Yes, it is a vegetable, but strangely became a fruit by a New York court in the 40’s because a judge decided that since it was used in this country as a fruit, it should be labeled as one.  I’m guessing science had nothing to do with that decision.  Anyway, with summer officially here, Jena and I thought it was time to get a new summer drink in the mix.  Last year I was into the Moscow mule in all it’s various forms.  This year however, needs to be a little more interesting.  What better way to pump some fun into the summer season than with an easy rhubarb syrup to flavor our various libations while soaking up the sun?

Rhubarb, for those of you who have not tried it, is a long, firm, red stalk with huge leaves, which happen to be poisonous, so don’t eat them!  I have fond memories as a kid of dipping stalks of rhubarb in a custard cup of granulated sugar while deciding what adventure me and my buds were going to go on that day.  We’d simply lick the end of the stalk to give the sugar something to cling to, then dip the stalk in the sugar and take a bite.  Our mouths would first taste the sweet sugar, but then feel the tartness of the rhubarb, making our faces contort into what we called the sour puss face.   Jena also has memories of eating the sour stalks as well, but hers didn’t involve sugar.  I guess that’s what hardcore country girls did on the farm.

Rhubarb summer cocktail recipes  | www.littlerustedladle.com #rhubarb #cocktails #foodphotography

There are many different uses for rhubarb.  It can be used in pies, salads, sauces, jams and jellies.  But in drinks?  Hell yes.  After spending some time recently in the windy city enjoying trendy drinks in trendy restaurants, I realized that rhubarb is starting to make it’s way into the millennium crowd.  One particular craft cocktail I had, contained a rhubarb shrub.  A shrubbery? you say.  No, not the kind found in a Monty Python movie, but the 1800’s version that is a combination of fruit syrup mixed with vinegar.  Shrubs were used as a way of preserving beverages before refrigeration and carbonation took center stage.  They had gone almost extinct until recently with the resurrection of the craft cocktail. It may sound weird, but is pretty tasty.  The added vinegar has a thirst quenching element that is great during those hot summer months.  Add booze and it will not only quench your thirst, but knock you on your ass.

The basis for all our rhubarb cocktails is simple, combine fresh(or frozen) rhubarb with sugar in a bowl and refrigerate it for 5 days.  Strain it and you’ll have a syrup that goes great with many kinds of alcohol including bourbon, vodka and gin.  Oh sure, you can simply add it to fresh lemonade or soda or tonic water, but doesn’t adding a little vodka and calling it a rhubarb vodka cooler sound better?

Rhubarb summer cocktail recipes  | www.littlerustedladle.com #rhubarb #cocktails #foodphotographyRhubarb summer cocktail recipes  | www.littlerustedladle.com #rhubarb #cocktails #foodphotographyRhubarb summer cocktail recipes  | www.littlerustedladle.com #rhubarb #cocktails #foodphotographyRhubarb summer cocktail recipes  | www.littlerustedladle.com #rhubarb #cocktails #foodphotographyRhubarb summer cocktail recipes  | www.littlerustedladle.com #rhubarb #cocktails #foodphotography

The three drinks we chose, were a classic bourbon old fashioned made with rhubarb, a rhubarb lemon martini and a rhubarb rosemary gin fizz using a homemade rhubarb shrub.  They are all distinctly different and very refreshing.  Try them this summer when you want something new.  As an added treat, use that tasty rhubarb syrup as a glaze on macadamia nuts, or in a vinaigrette for salads.  The options are endless.  Then next time you see rhubarb at the farmers market, take it home, and dip it in some sugar.  You just might uncover your inner child and understand why kids love sour candy so much.  If not, stick to the cocktails or there’s always the strawberry rhubarb pie.  Whatever your fancy, remember to always cook with love and live to cook.

Jim & Jena

Rhubarb summer cocktail recipes  | www.littlerustedladle.com #rhubarb #cocktails #foodphotographyRhubarb summer cocktail recipes  | www.littlerustedladle.com #rhubarb #cocktails #foodphotographyRhubarb summer cocktail recipes  | www.littlerustedladle.com #rhubarb #cocktails #foodphotographyRhubarb summer cocktail recipes  | www.littlerustedladle.com #rhubarb #cocktails #foodphotographyRhubarb summer cocktail recipes  | www.littlerustedladle.com #rhubarb #cocktails #foodphotographyRhubarb summer cocktail recipes  | www.littlerustedladle.com #rhubarb #cocktails #foodphotographyRhubarb summer cocktail recipes  | www.littlerustedladle.com #rhubarb #cocktails #foodphotographyRhubarb summer cocktail recipes  | www.littlerustedladle.com #rhubarb #cocktails #foodphotographyRhubarb summer cocktail recipes  | www.littlerustedladle.com #rhubarb #cocktails #foodphotography

5.0 from 1 reviews
Rhubarb Syrup
 
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This simple syrup made with rhubarb is a wonderful base for many cocktails or beverages.
Author:
Recipe type: Cocktail
Serves: 1 cup
Ingredients
  • 5 cups fresh rhubarb, thinly sliced (can substitute frozen, thawed)
  • 2 cups granulated sugar
Instructions
  1. In a large bowl, combine rhubarb and sugar. Toss to coat. Cover and refrigerate up to 5 days, stirring once a day. Strain juice into a container. Reserve strained rhubarb for another use such as rhubarb bourbon old fashioned. Refrigerate syrup up to 2 weeks. or freeze until needed. Use as a mixer for cocktails like rhubarb bourbon old fashioned, rhubarb martini, rhubarb rosemary gin fizz and rhubarb shrub.

5.0 from 1 reviews
Rhubarb Bourbon Old Fashioned
 
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This classic cocktail gets a modern twist with the addition of rhubarb syrup and a rhubarb garnish
Author:
Recipe type: Cocktails
Serves: 1 drink
Ingredients
  • 3 pieces leftover rhubarb from making rhubarb syrup
  • 1 fresh strawberry
  • 3-4 drops orange bitters
  • 2 ozs. Basil Haydens Bourbon
  • 1 oz. rhubarb syrup (see recipe)
  • ½ oz. sweet vermouth
  • splash of soda or sour, optional
Instructions
  1. Muddle rhubarb,strawberry and bitters in a mixing glass. Add ice, bourbon & sweet vermouth. Top with lid. Shake a few times, then strain into glass with large cubes. Top with soda if desired. Serve

5.0 from 1 reviews
Rhubarb Shrub
 
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Vinegar gives this tart drink base added zing. Use it as a mixer for cocktails
Author:
Recipe type: Cocktail
Serves: 2 cups
Ingredients
  • 1 cup rhubarb syrup
  • 1 cup raspberry or white wine vinegar
Instructions
  1. combine syrup and vinegar. Store in a mason jar in the refrigerator for 1 week. Use as a mixer for cocktails, or add non-alcoholic beverage of choice.

 

 

5.0 from 1 reviews
Rhubarb Rosemary Gin Fizz
 
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Author:
Recipe type: Cocktail
Serves: 1 cocktail
Ingredients
  • 1 small sprig rosemary
  • 1 piece fresh lime
  • 1½ ozs. good quality gin
  • 1 oz. rhubarb shrub
  • splash of white soda or club soda
  • ice
Instructions
  1. In a tall glass, add 1 piece of lime, and a small sprig of rosemary. smash with muddler. Add ice, gin prepared rhubarb shrub and top with soda. Garnish with rosemary sprig.

5.0 from 1 reviews
Rhubarb Lemondrop Martini
 
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This martini may look timid, but it still packs a punch.
Author:
Recipe type: Cocktails
Serves: 1 Martini
Ingredients
  • 1 twist of lemon
  • 2 ozs. good quality vodka
  • ½ oz. fresh lemon juice
  • 1 oz. rhubarb syrup (see recipe)
  • ice
Instructions
  1. pour vodka into an ice filled shaker cup. Squeeze lemon juice into cup, then add rhubarb syrup. Cover with lid and shake a few times. Strain into martini glasses and garnish with a lemon twist.

Katie - Oh this looks amazing! I’ve been trying to come up with a few new wine cocktails, so I’ll definitely give this rhubarb shrub a try.

Sharron Fisher - I really can’t get over how beautiful your photography and presentation is. A real standout! I always look forward to “digesting” your posts.

keith gooderham - Superb inspirational images – cheers!

Felicia@Ingredient1 - Wow, beautiful photography! This recipe is a perfect party trick…

Korean Beef Hand Pies

Korean Beef Hand Pies | www.littlerustedladle.com

The pot pie has had many transformations over the 10,000 plus years since it made its first appearance.  In 9500BC it was made with only oat, wheat, rye and barley, and flavored with honey.  Savory meat pies made their way into the mix during medieval times, and were called “coffins”.  I’m not sure whose idea that was, but if Swanson tried using that one, they would have gone out of business a long time ago.  Since the crust was actually used as the actual baking dish (apparently Pyrex and Le Creuset had not been invented yet.), it wasn’t actually edible.  The name has changed over the centuries from coffins to pyes to magpies, etc. Many cultures gave it a go, learning from the previous version and putting their own spin on it.  Then as usual, the French and Italians made them better by refining the pastry into a flaky pastry made with butter, which confirms once again that just about anything is better when made with butter.

These flaky pastries filled with meat and vegetables made their way to other countries, where they were tweeked to fit their own cultures.  They were given names like steak pie, tourtiere, Jamaican patty, fatayer, samosa, empanada, and of course, the pasty, which made its way into my childhood memories thanks to my mom’s Upper Peninsula Michigan ancestry der don’t cha know.  Sorry, even writing about those Cornish beef and potato filled treasures makes me write like a “yooper”.  A dialect used in northern Michigan and Wisconsin.

Korean Beef Hand Pies | www.littlerustedladle.comKorean Beef Hand Pies | www.littlerustedladle.com

Since Jena and I wanted to do an article on pot pies, we thought we would create some fun variations to the popular chicken pot pie.  Our goal was to do four or five different kinds of pies like we usually do and post one every week.  However, life sometimes throws curveballs like babies, sickness, work and moving that sometimes alters your intentions.  So, “you can’t always get what you want, but if you try sometime, you just might find, you get what you need.” Thanks Mick, we agree with that philosophy.  Instead of doing four, we did one good one, and added another video.  Rather than creating a pot pie big enough to feed a family, we made a delicious hand held version perfect for those who like to eat on the run.  Also, since you don’t see too many pastries filled with meat in the far east besides egg rolls or pot stickers, we decided to do a pot pie version of a Korean beef taco.

Sesame Seeds for Korean Beef Hand Pies | www.littlerustedladle.comKorean Beef Hand Pies | www.littlerustedladle.comKorean Beef Hand Pies | www.littlerustedladle.com

For these Korean Beef Hand Pies, we started with boneless beef short ribs cooked in a pressure cooker with chicken broth, soy, chili paste, garlic, ginger, scallions and mushrooms until tender and juicy.  The meat is shredded and then rice noodles and pea pods were added for texture and color.  This mixture was cooled, then spooned onto store bought dough rounds cut into four inch fluted circles using a small tart pan.  A large tin can like we used for the pound cake can also be used, or simply make cutouts with round paper templates.  The addition of chili paste and cilantro on top give it a little acid and fresh flavor.  Brush the edges with egg wash and top with another four inch pastry round on top that has been rolled a little larger to accommodate the filling.  Sprinkle the top with wasabi flavored and black sesame seeds, and bake until golden brown.  We loved their cute appearance and the portable nature.  The tender short rib meat combined with the savory and spicy juices was a perfect contrast to the flaky, buttery crust.  These would be wonderful appetizers for a party if made a little smaller, or excellent as lunch item that can be reheated in the toaster oven or as dinner with a light salad.

Korean Beef Hand Pies | www.littlerustedladle.comKorean Beef Hand Pies | www.littlerustedladle.comKorean Beef Hand Pies | www.littlerustedladle.com

So the next time you’re thinking about whipping up a chicken pot pie, think a little outside the box, or should I say pie?  For a spring time treat, add some asparagus, fresh morel mushrooms, tomatoes and cheese.  See the article we did two years ago on morel mushrooms as an option for the filling.  Some pulled pork and jerk seasoning, seafood or perhaps some fresh organic vegetables and tofu if meat isn’t your thing. Regardless of your choice, the time tested pot pie is and will always be a comfort food classic because of it’s very nature. It’s an edible gift filled with wonders that make our tastebuds happy. Until next time, remember to cook with love and live to cook.
Jim & Jena

 

Korean Beef Hand Pies
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
The Pot Pie gets a facelift with this Korean inspired hand pie. They can be made as an appetizer, a snack, as an on the go lunch or as a entree.
Author:
Recipe type: Main
Cuisine: Korean
Serves: 8 hand pies
Ingredients
  • 1¾ lb Beef short ribs
  • 1 Cup Chicken Broth
  • ½ Cup Soy sauce
  • ¼ Cup Hoisin sauce
  • 1 Tbsp Chili paste
  • 1 Whole Green onion
  • 1 Tbsp Ginger paste
  • 1 tsp Garlic paste
  • 4 Whole Dried shiitake mushrooms
  • 1 Cup Rice noodles
  • ½ Cup Pea pods, cut into 1" pieces
  • 4 Whole Refrigerated pie dough rounds (9 inch)
  • 3 Tbsp Chili sauce
  • ½ C. Cilantro leaves, washed
  • 1 Whole Egg (Beaten)
  • 2 Tbsp Flavored sesame seeds
Instructions
  1. Place short ribs in a large pressure cooker or crock pot. In a small bowl, combine next 7 ingredients.
  2. Pour mixture over short ribs. Move ribs around to coat with sauce. Cover pressure cooker and seal.
  3. Place cooker over medium high heat. When pressure cooker seals, set timer for 30 min. Remove cooker from heat and release pressure until top can be opened.
  4. Transfer meat to a plate and shred with 2 forks.
  5. Meanwhile, skim off fat from remaining cooking liquid.
  6. Break rice noodles into 2" pieces and add to cooking liquid.
  7. Cut pea pods into 1" pieces and add to cooking liquid.
  8. Add shredded beef back to liquid. Fold mixture together until beef is well sauced and ingredients are blended.
  9. Refrigerate beef mixture until ready to fill pies.
  10. To make pies, cut out 16 / 4" rounds using a can, cutter or a small tart pan.
  11. Place rounds on a parchment lined sheet pan. Spoon about ½ cup of beef mixture over 8 dough rounds, leaving about ½" border. Pre-heat oven to 400 degrees.
  12. Spoon about a teaspoon of chili sauce over beef, then top with a few cilantro leaves.
  13. Brush edges with beaten egg.
  14. Place remaining dough rounds on top and carefully press together to seal.
  15. Brush tops with egg, then quickly sprinkle with sesame seeds. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until golden brown. Serve.

 

Dolores Jacq - Looks yummy and beautiful! Another one knocked out of the park!

Eva Delbriemari - This looks amazing! @evadelbelle

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